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Wednesday, November 16, 2005

The Debate on ID Cards

Yesterday (15th November 2005), the debate about UK National ID Cards began in the House of Lords.  The Government’s proposal for ID Cards is still in the debate stage. But Blair and most of his ministers are determined that legislation for ID Cards will be carried through and they want to start issuing them in 2008.

Feelings in the UK run very high over this matter.  The concept of ‘Civil Liberties’ is held dear by many of us (despite the fact that we have very few real civil liberties anyhow).  In the present climate of lies, intrigue and blatant mistrust of government, ID cards are seen as another step forward for Blair’s dreams of running a totalitarian state.

I looked at a debate instigated by Jeremy Thompson on his weblog:

http://jeremythompson.typepad.com/my_weblog/2005/11/id_cards_nation.html#comments

This is well worth a look to get an idea of the views and strong feelings behind this whole issue.

Opinion was quite sharply divided between those who said “If you have nothing to hide, why not?” and “It’s the EU that’s wants these cards anyway, not our Government”, to those who completely opposed the whole concept.

One quote I found particularly interesting.  It was from a gentleman from Northumberland.  I hope he doesn’t mind me quoting him here, because his thoughts on this matter echo my own:

“The card itself is a mere McGuffin; the real issue here is the National Identity Register, which will be so all-pervading and all-encompassing that it will dwarf anything dreamt up by Soviet Russia, though if companies like EDS and/or Capita get the contracts if the legislation is pushed forward it will be even less efficient. Whatever the case, the concept is a monstrous thing to have in a western democracy. Even the USA won't consider such a vast centralised database.Nothing to hide?  Neither had Anne Frank.”

Exactly!

posted by summersun70 at 4:23 AM

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